(A soldier from the Tatmadaw who has been served for security of the vice president during his trip in Arakan State.)

Min Tun | DMG
9 October, Sittwe
 
Since the Tatmadaw has equipped its armed forces with more weapons and ammunition, armed conflicts are likely to be intensifying in coming days, the Arakan Army (AA) said on 8 October.

Fighting can be more extreme as the Tatmadaw keeps conducting offensive attacks although three northern alliance groups including the AA announced a unilateral ceasefire, said Khaing Thukha, spokesperson of the AA.

“The Burmese military has enhanced its arsenal across Arakan State these days. So we announced that fighting can be fiercer in coming days,” he said. 

The Tatmadaw is carrying operations for regional stability and a better administrative mechanism in Arakan State, it is the Tatmadaw’s duty whether it increases munitions or not, said Colonel Win Zaw Oo, the head of Western Command.

“We’re operating for regional stability and an improved administrative mechanism in Arakan State. It is our duty, whether or not we provide more weapons or ammunition. As long as AA has been in Arakan State, clashes will keep occurring. If AA leaves Arakan State, things will become tranquilized,” he said.

The AA has accused the Tatmadaw of exploiting monasteries and deserted villages, where villagers fled to safe places, to conduct attacks against AA.

Colonel Win Zaw Oo, the head of Western Command, however, has denied the accusation, saying “there is no reason to fight under the cover of these areas.”

The northern alliance groups (AA, TNLA and MNDAA) released a statement on 20 September declaring a unilateral ceasefire until 31 December to reduce fighting and to sign a bilateral ceasefire agreement.

Fighting on the ground, however, is continuing in Arakan State and northern Shan State.

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